Cognitive Training at The Greenwood School

The most cutting-edge approaches to remediating Language Based Learning Disabilities such as dyslexia include creating brains that have better capacities for all of the skills involved in reading. The Greenwood School offers individualized “TCI” cognitive training based on the science of neuroplasticity. A Targeted Cognitive Intervention program consists of computer-based exercises designed to strengthen specific neural networks associated with reading, along with reaction time, processing speed, working memory and processing speed.

 
TCI Research
 
The TCI training program we use today at The Greenwood School, was created at the Carroll School and validated by MIT researchers who specialize in the remediation of dyslexia. On average, students whose reading fluency is in the lowest 20% move into the average range after completing two 30-session TCI programs, in conjunction with language-based remediation. We are proud to be collaborating with Steve Wilkins and his amazing team. Steve is Head of School at Carroll and a valued member of Greenwood’s Board of Trustees.
 
How does TCI impact reading?
 
TCI computer-based training builds neural networks in the brain, just like going to the gym builds muscles in the body. TCI focuses on specific neural pathways associated with reading and supports processing speed, reaction time, working memory and executive functioning, the cognitive underpinnings necessary for decoding and understanding the written word. Stronger neural networks translate to higher brain capacity. Greenwood students increase their capacity to process and retain new information through TCI and coupled with language-based reading tutorials, the result is improved overall reading and comprehension.

TCI VS. Reading Tutorials?
 
TCI is not designed to be a stand-alone remediation program for dyslexia. Instead, TCI augments Greenwood’s language tutorials given by sophisticated teachers skilled in Orton-Gillingham, Lindamood-Bell and Wilson Reading System.
 
What does a TCI program look like?
 
In the same way a personal trainer helps you strengthen specific muscles with physical exercises, TCI remediates cognitive weaknesses with targeted computer based mental exercises. Like a personal trainer, a TCI class monitor provides feedback and strategies to get the most out of each training session. One TCI program consists of:
 
- 30 computer-based training sessions, 30 to 40 minutes each, 3 to 4 times weekly
 
Everyone has a different brain. In turn, every student receives an individualized TCI program based on the following protocol:
 
1. Before starting, a battery of tests is given to measure cognitive and language based     skills
2. Test results are reviewed to identify the student’s most prevalent weakness.
3. A computer-based exercise program that targets that weakness is assigned.
4. Students are retested post training at year-end.
5. Students retrain to address the next area of weakness.

The goal is to eliminate all weaknesses
 
Ted Backes, Greenwood’s Admissions Director, on Cognitive Training
 
“We felt it was a moral imperative for Greenwood to make available the most effective program to help students acquire improved language and reading skills. Cognitive Training moves that needle.”
 
Before taking the seat as Admissions Director at The Greenwood School, Ted Backes worked in the field of applied neuroscience as a cognitive trainer for 7 years. While living in Connecticut he and Caryl Frankenberger, now Head of School, introduced Greenwood to the concept of cognitive training as a science backed approach to improving a student’s ability to learn. At Greenwood we are fortunate to have leaders experienced in the field of cognitive neuroscience overseeing the TCI program.
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    • TCI computer-based exercises build neural pathways associated with reading.